Wednesday, April 4, 2007

Yiddish Class: Chicken Soup

Alternate Version: QuickTime.

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19 comments:

Steve Woolf said...

ok, now i'm hungry. i always loved the heavy, solid matzah balls instead of the fluffy ones. maybe i'm just weird. :)

suzin garfield zimble said...

Millie,
This is your cousin, Suzin Garfield Zimble......I'm surprised that you didn't know that matzo balls are kinadle (sp). Steffie told me about your blog. I think it's terrific.

millie garfield said...

Suzan
Thanks for droping by.
You are absolutely right - I was surprised too that I didn't know that knadle was matzo ball in yiddish. I forgot!!

How do you say "chicken" in yiddish?
Howq do you say parsnip in yiddish?

"By your pupil's you'll be taugh."

.

Danielle said...

Millie,

Matzo balls are "Kneidalach" (a tiny different than what Suzin wrote).

and for the legs of the chicken, do you say: "Poolkeh"? I seem to remember that from somewhere.

All the best!

millie garfield said...

danielle

A knadle is one matzo ball
kneidach are more than one matzo ball

about a chicken leg - you are right, it is a poolkeh

When I said a chicken leg makes the soup sweet what I really meant was the "little feesalarh." I f you look at the video again you will see a picture of the feesalah. I don't know how you say that in english!!! - the feet? I think that's it!!

Rhea said...

Great lesson! I make chicken soup but it's never as good as what my mother made.

Claude said...

My mom called matzah balls kneidlachs, I just loved the ones she made! You reminded me of her chicken soup! Thanks for the lesson, Millie. It was good seeing you and listening to you!

Kay Dennison said...

It looks sooooooo good, Millie!!!! A furrier I worked for in NYC called matzoh balls knaidlach -- his wife kept sending it to me because she thought "the Irisher madchen" (me) needed some meat on her bones! lol I always loved it! the worst part of coming back to Ohio was that in my town there isn't a decent deli despite a good-sized Jewish population. sigh

millie garfield said...

Rhea

Me too, I always try to make my soup taste like my mothers but it never does. I have tried making the soup with a kosher chicken, more water, less water, but it never comes out like hers, it taste good but it's just not the same.

Same goes for potato latkes, good, not like my mothers.

millie garfield said...

Kay

Interesting what you said about no jewish deli's in Ohio even though there is a sizable jewish population.

That's true too where I live in Swampscott, Ma.

I have had the most delicious cornbeef sandwichs here in Florida, it's almost worth the trip just for the deli!

Toby said...

Millie - My Nana use to take a little bit of the knadle mixture and add a little cinnamon to that. She would then put a little of the cinnamon-knadle mixture in the center of each matzo ball. When we cut them open it was like finding a surprise.

Now the important question: soft or hard matzo balls?

Hope you and your family enjoyed a wonderful Passover.

Olivier Goldstein said...

A gitten tug fin Belgium,

I've look at your footage and It made me real plaisur ;-)

It's true Kneidler mit Yor, lokchen in pulke zind a zooï git ;-)

I use also Haïn... I couldn't find the name in english (excuse my french) It's red and geribene roots that gives a spicy taste to the yor. But beware don't use too much of it or your gonne have a nezale backdraft ...hehehhe

Could you lurn me how to bake a gitten Halla ven pessah is finish ?

A gitten coshere pessah

olivier@goldstein.be

Kevin Kennedy-Spaien said...

Oy, but I could go for some knaidlach right about now, with schmaltz and broth mixed into the batter!

I swear it's the best pesadic food, bar none! Keep your brisket and your fricasse, just give me a triple batch of knaidle!

Helen said...

"chicken" in regural Yiddish is "hindl". "Chicken" became universally used when Jews moved to America and started learning English.

'Parsnip" in Yiddish is "Pasternak" (emphasis on -NAK). Had to look that one up!

I was kind of disappointed with the lesson, because I was hoping there would be an actual demonstration on chicken-soup making. Now that we now what goes in there, maybe you could make it, Millie?

millie garfield said...

Helen

Thanks for telling me the yiddish word for parsnip. Now that you said it was pasternak, I remembered the word, brings back memories. That's what my mother called it.

About making kitchen soup, visit "Feed Me Bubbe". She has a whole series on how to make chicken soup!

Cammico said...

I love you and the videos, My boyfriend is jewish so i thought i'd impress him with alittle yiddish.

but one thing i have to add for you is that a pullet is actually a young female chicken, but nearly all supermarket birds are pullets or cockerels (young male) but they just dont write it on there anymore. hope that little tidbit helps you somehow down the road.


thanks for the videos!!!
<3
~Brooke W.

Generic Viagra said...

is not only a delicious dish, is the better way to keep you strong when you suffer a cold, talking about this there's nothing like add some drops of lemmon to this soup.

Elinjo said...

Dear Millie,
You took me back to my childhood; locshen, kneidalach, schmaltz and the tiny eggs that used to go into the soup. My mother used to stuff the chicken's neck; do you know what that's called?
Thank you!

Anonymous said...

I believe a neck is the gergel.